We are using cookies to implement functions like login, shopping cart or language selection for this website. Furthermore we use Google Analytics to create anonymized statistical reports of the usage which creates Cookies too. You will find more information in our privacy policy.
OK, I agree I do not want Google Analytics-Cookies
The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants
Login:
username:

password:

Plattform:

Forgotten password?

Registration

Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 14 (1999), No. 2     15. Apr. 1999
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 14 (1999), No. 2  (15.04.1999)

Page 239-247


Osteoblastic Cell Attachment to Hydroxyapatite-Coated Implant Surfaces In Vitro
Chang, Yu-Liang / Stanford, Clark M. / Wefel, James S. / Keller, John C.
Hydroxyapatite (HA) used as a coating for implants can exhibit varying levels of interaction with the biologic environment. The crystallinity of the HA-based coating has been shown to control the rate of dissolution and appears to play a role in the initial cellular interaction with the implant surfaces. An osteoblastic cell attachment assay was employed to examine the cell attachment to untreated and pretreated (pH 5.2, 24 hours) titanium and HA coatings of low (50%), medium (75%), and high (90%) crystallinity. A slightly higher percentage of cell attachment (%CA) was found on untreated and pretreated HA surfaces as compared to the titanium surface. No significant difference could be found in the %CA between the 3 levels of crystallinity. However, higher levels of %CA were observed on pretreated HA surfaces than on untreated HA surfaces (t test, P < .05). Elevated calcium and phosphate levels in culture medium did not have any effect on cell attachment. Scanning electron microscopic examinations revealed surface degradation of the HA coating following pretreatment in the simulated inflammatory media (pH 5.2, 24 hours). The results suggest that the altered surface topography may influence the initial cell attachment to HA surfaces.

Keywords: cell adhesion, crystallinity, dissolution, hydroxyapatite, osseointegration, osteoblast